Thursday, 19 January 2017

How to Properly Visit a Gallery

We've all done it. Gone to a new museum and felt the need to get our money's worth by seeing ALL of it (even if it was free to get in). 

The slow walk through each room, pausing at every interesting looking piece, and reading text panels gets old quickly. Soon the slow walk becomes feet dragging, the pause happens less often, and we begin to fake read the text panels. Don't even get me started on some of those tedious audio guides. 

Stop it. Just stop it.

{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Museum going shouldn't be a drag. A lot of hard work went into curating each display just to be ignored by you because you're tired and let's be honest, hangry. No good can come of this situation.

But fear not, I have a solution to combat the dreaded museum fatigue. (it's a real thing!)

Plan it out
{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Before you arrive: if there is a particular exhibition you want to see, check out the website first and maybe even purchase your tickets online to avoid waiting in line. Also be aware, sometimes blockbuster exhibits are timed entry.

Once arrived with ticket in hand, it can be a good idea to coat check, if available. Winter in Canada can be glorious, until you are sweltering indoors lugging around your mitts, hat, scarf, and Canada Goose down-filled coat. Trust me, coat check. You will thank me for this in the end.

Favourite piece
{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Okay, we've made it into our first exhibit space. Hurray! So far so good, no signs of museum fatigue just yet. 

Wander the displays at your leisure, only reading the panels that interest you most (you don't have to examine and read every single thing you can see. You aren't expected to).  

If you are visiting with someone, make a plan to meet in the middle of the room once you've both finished wandering and take a small moment to discuss your favourite pieces. Maybe even go back and visit those pieces together. 

Which brings me to my next point,

{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Rest
{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

What I'm displaying in these two photographs are classic signs of museum fatigue. Feet hurting, shifting weight, losing interest in what I'm looking at. But still feeling the urge to continue. MUST. SEE. IT. ALL.
{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Instead, be like this dude. The benches provided in exhibit spaces are not meant solely for the very young and the very old. Go on and have a seat yourself. Take a moment to be super contemplative about the pieces around you, or maybe take a #museumselfie if that's more your style. Either way, rest. Start back up again once you feel ready. No need to rush things.

{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

Visit the Cafe
{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum

I am always up for a visit to the museum cafe (I heart a museum cafe!). I suggest about halfway through your visit follow the general ambient noises of coffee making and dishes clinking and get some caffeine in you, maybe a little something for the blood sugars, and rest those feet before heading back out there. You're bound to be hungry and it really makes a day of things.

Seriously though, going versus not going can mean the difference between a fabulous day out and ruining lives by not being able to take back what you said in hanger.

{ErinOutandAbout} Avoid Museum Fatigue: How to Properly Visit a Museum


That's how it's done, son!


What do you do to avoid museum fatigue?

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